• LOCAL WORKERS

    You may Contact Us, or send us a Recruitment Request, and one of our placement specialists would contact you to understand your needs and develop a customized package. We gather all available resume and received through our advertisement campaigns, and do an initial screening, the initial screening criteria is defined based on your (the employer) requirements


    After the initial screening, the candidates are contacted and the one on one interviews begin. After the interview process, we will proceed with a Skill Behaviour Assessment. In this process, the candidates are given small projects and work scenarios dependent upon the requirements of job position. This process assists in the selection of the ideal candidate.


    All the qualified candidates have to provide us with a minimum of 2 supervisory references, and we carry out the reference and background check.


    Upon completion of all requirements, we submit our recommendations to you the (the employer) along with all the documentation.


    This option is best suitable for those employers whose business is either in a remote location, and due to which they have difficulty of retaining the employees, or for employers where the positions need on-the-job training and if the employee does not qualify after the probation period, the employer needs to replace the position with a new candidate. Our company provides a "Replacement Option" in which for a small extra cost, we provide either an emergency replacement till we find a new candidate for our client. This service provides a peace of mind to the employers because the complete burden of recruiting and training for new workers falls on our shoulders. If you are interested in taking advantage of your services, please fill in the form below, and one of our Employment Specialist will contact you with a tailored solution suitable to your needs.


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  • INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

    Employers can hire eligible students during their studies or after they graduate. Study permit holders may be eligible to work off campus without a work permit as soon as they begin their studies in Canada.Students who are eligible may work for any eligible Canadian employer for up to 20 hours a week while class is in session, and full-time during scheduled breaks in the academic calendar.


    To qualify, students must:
    • have a valid study permit,
    • be a full-time student,
    • be enrolled at a designated learning institution at the post-secondary level or, in Quebec, a vocational program at the secondary level,
    • and
    • be studying in an academic, vocational or professional training program that leads to a degree, diploma or certificate that is at least six months in duration.

    Students are responsible for ensuring they meet these criteria and applying for a Social Insurance Number. As an employer, you should ensure that the student you hire has a valid study permit. You may wish to ask the student for a letter of enrolment to confirm that the student is studying full-time in an eligible program at a post-secondary institution (or a vocational program at the secondary level in Quebec).


    Foreign nationals who have completed a program of at least eight months at an eligible Canadian educational institution may apply for a Post-Graduation Work Permit. This permit allows international students who have completed their studies to work for any eligible employer in Canada for up to three years, depending on the duration of the course of study.

    • Processing times: Vary depending on how the application is made.
    • The foreign worker is responsible for the application process.
    • These permits are open work permits, allowing the student to work for any eligible employer in Canada.
    • A Post-Graduation Work Permit can last up to three years, depending on the duration of the course of study.


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  • FOREIGN WORKERS

    Employers can hire foreign workers through the Temporary Foreign Worker Program or the International Mobility Program. The Temporary Foreign Worker Program lets employers hire foreign workers to fill temporary labour and skill shortages. Employers need to get a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) to hire through this program. An LMIA verifies that there is a need for a foreign worker and that no Canadians can do the job. The International Mobility Program lets employers hire foreign workers without the need of an LMIA. Exemptions from the LMIA process are available where there are reciprocal benefits for Canadians and other competitive advantages for Canada. Employers need to pay an employer compliance fee and submit an Offer of Employment form to Citizenship and Immigration Canada before the foreign national can apply for a work permit. A Form Aid is available to help you complete the Offer of Employment form. Employers can hire workers abroad or already in Canada.


    When an Employer needs workers, and all the local efforts are exhausted, meaning by, once the employer is unable to find required man power from within Canada, then the only solution to overcome the Labour Shortage is to hire foreign workers.

    In order for the foreign worker, in most of the cases, the potential candidate will have to apply to get a Work Permit from outside of Canada, in order for a candidate to apply for a Work Permit, the employer will have to provide the candidate with a document known as Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) formally known as Labour Market Opinion (LMO) when hiring Temporary Foreign Workers, and when hiring Foreign Worker permanently then was called Arranged Employment Opinion (AEO). But now there is only one name used for this application/document, which is LMIA. As an employer, you may need to apply for a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) before you can hire a foreign worker or get pre-approval to hire a large number of workers. A positive LMIA will show that there is a need for the foreign worker to fill the job you offer and that there is no Canadian worker available to do the job. To apply for Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), or to hire a worker through International CO-OP, Working Holiday or Young Professional programs, where an LMIA might not be needed, you may Contact Us, or can submit your information and requirment to us, for a faster and reliable solution.


    Foreign workers can help employers meet their labour needs when Canadians and permanent residents are not available. These workers often bring new skills and knowledge to help the country's economy grow. Under the Stream for Higher-skilled Occupations, employers can hire foreign workers in higher-skilled positions such as: management, professional, scientific, technical or trade occupations. These occupations can be found throughout many sectors of the economy, and as a result often have very diverse recruitment practices and regulatory requirements. Employers can hire skilled foreign workers to either support the worker's:

    • Temporary employment; or
    • Permanent resident visa application.

    For High Skilled Worker Labour Market Impact Assessment Applications, which are supporting the permanent residency of the potential employees, there are three Immigration Streams and for each stream the employment offer must adhere to the minimum conditions defined in that stream. Summary of those is given below:

    Federal Skilled Workers Program (FSWP)

    • Job offer is permanent, full-time, non-seasonal
    • Assists foreign workers to gain permanent residency

    Federal Skilled Trades Program (FSTP)

    • Position must be an eligible skilled trade occupation, as designated by CIC
    • Job offer is permanent (minimum of 1 year, which can be from up to 2 employers), full-time, non-seasonal
    • assists foreign workers to gain permanent residency

    Canadian Experience Class (CEC)

    • Job offer is permanent, full-time (at least 30 hours per week) and non-seasonal
    • assists foreign workers to gain permanent residency
    • the foreign worker must have at least 12 months of full-time, or an equivalent amount in part-time, skilled work experience in Canada within 36 months.

    You (the employer) may be allowed to hire temporary foreign workers for a maximum of 24 months through the Stream for Lower-skilled Occupations when there is a demonstrable shortage of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. In Canada, lower levels of formal training are defined as occupations that usually require at most a high school diploma or a maximum of 2 years of job-specific training according to the NOC Classification system. These occupations are coded at the NOC C or D skill level. Employers must pay $1,000 for each position requested (e.g. $1,000 x number of positions=total payment) to cover the cost of processing a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) application. The processing fee payment (in Canadian dollars) can be made by:

    • Certified cheque (payable to the Receiver General for Canada)
    • Money order (postal or bank)
    • Visa
    • MasterCard
    • American Express

    There will be no refund in the event of a negative LMIA, or if the application is withdrawn or cancelled by the employer since the fee covers the assessment process and not the outcome.Employers requesting to have their LMIA application reconsidered, as a result of a negative LMIA, must submit a new application and processing fee for each position.

    Refunds will only be available if a fee was collected in error (e.g. an incorrect fee amount was processed).

    Transition to a Canadian Workforce

    Employers must engage in activities to transition to a Canadian workforce and reduce their reliance on TFWs. The specific requirements an employer must follow are determined by the wage being offered for the position, in relation to the provincial/territorial median hourly wage, based on Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (2013).

    Employers offering a wage to a TFW that is:

    BELOW the provincial/territorial median hourly wage will be subject to a cap on low-wage positions; AT or ABOVE the provincial/territorial median hourly wage will be required to complete a Transition Plan for high-wage positions

    Cap on Low-wage category Positions

    Employers offering a wage to a TFW that is below the provincial/territorial median hourly wage will be subject to a maximum 10% cap on the proportion of low-wage TFWs. The cap will be phased in over the next 2 years to provide employers who use the Program with time to transition to a Canadian workforce.

    Employers that have a low-wage TFW workforce will be:

    • Limited to 30% or frozen at their current level, whichever is lower;
    • Reduced to 20% beginning July 1, 2015; and
    • Further reduced to 10% on July 1, 2016.
    • The 10% cap is the maximum percentage of low-wage TFWs that an employer will be allowed to have at a work site, as of July 2016.

    Employers offering a wage to a TFW that is at, or above the provincial/territorial median hourly wage will be required to submit a Transition Plan. The purpose of Transition Plan is to identify the activities an employer is agreeing to undertake to recruit, retain and train Canadians/permanent residents and to assist TFWs to become permanent residents, if a positive opinion is issued. The Transition Plan activities begin, once the positive opinion has been issued, and must occur throughout the duration of the employment period. Employers will be required to report on the results of the commitments they have made in their Transition Plan, if they:

    • Are selected for an inspection, or
    • Choose to re-apply for a new LMIA for the same occupation and work location.

    The report on the Transition Plan will be used to determine whether the employer has met the conditions of their previous applications. Employers MAY be exempt from the Transition Plan requirement if they are hiring TFWs for positions which have a limited duration of between:

    • 1 and 120 days (e.g. emergency or warranty work positions); and
    • more than 120 days to a maximum of 2 year (e.g. non-recurring project-based positions)

    A distinct language assessment factor has been introduced as subsection 203 (1.01) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR). As a result, English and French are the only languages that can be identified as a job requirement both in LMIA applications and in job advertisements by employers, unless they can demonstrate that another language is essential for the job.


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  • INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS

    The NAFTA seeks to liberalize trade between the U.S., Mexico and Canada and abolish tariffs and other trade barriers. The Agreement opens up the three countries’ markets by ensuring that future laws will not create barriers to doing business. In order for trade to expand, individuals must have access to each other'S country to sell, provide goods or services or trade and invest. Chapter 16 of the NAFTA, entitled “Temporary Entry for Business Persons”, provides the mechanisms to allow selected categories of temporary workers access to each other’s market(s). Chapter 16 eases the temporary entry of citizens of the U.S., Mexico and Canada, whose activities are related to the trade of goods or services, or to investment. The NAFTA is a reciprocal agreement and Canadians will be afforded similar treatment when seeking entry to the U.S. or Mexico. Chapter 16 does not replace, but adds to our existing general provisions. An American or Mexican business person seeking entry to Canada is eligible for consideration under the provisions of the NAFTA, as well as the general provisions which apply to all foreign workers.


    The NAFTA reflects a preferential trading relationship initiated between Canada and the U.S. under the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) and now expanded to include Mexico. With the coming into force of the NAFTA, the FTA was suspended. Chapter 16 of the NAFTA is modelled on the FTA and deals only with temporary entry of selected business persons. It has no effect on permanent residence. The Agreement defines temporary entry as entry without the intent to establish permanent residence. Under the NAFTA, the U.S., Mexico and Canada are required to meet a number of obligations. Among them are the publication of a public information booklet on temporary entry under the NAFTA and the provision of statistical information. Given the growing public image of the NAFTA and the importance of sharing information with our NAFTA partners, it is crucial that data entered into FOSS or GCMS be as accurate and as complete as possible in order to meet our obligations related to statistics. A trilateral Temporary Entry Working Group, consisting of officials from departments which have an interest in the temporary entry of workers, meets every year to oversee the implementation and administration of Chapter 16 of the NAFTA. The director of Economic Policy and Programs (SSE), Selection Branch (SSD), and U.S. and Mexican immigration officials co-chair this working group. The Working Group is also responsible to develop measures to facilitate temporary entry of business persons on a reciprocal basis.


    NAFTA facilitates temporary entry for business persons who are citizens of the U.S., Mexico and Canada and who are involved in the trade of goods or services, or in investment activities. NAFTA removes the need for a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) for all business persons covered by the Agreement. In the case of a business visitor, it removes the need for a work permit.

    For professionals and intra-company transferees, it expedites the application process because one can apply at the port of entry (POE), (note that nationals who require a temporary resident visa to enter Canada, however, should apply at a visa office prior to coming to Canada).


    NAFTA does not assist permanent admission. It does not apply to permanent residents of the three countries. It does not replace the general provisions dealing with foreign workers. It has no effect on universal requirements related to passports and identity documentation, medical examinations and safety and security. It does not replace the need for workers to meet licensing or certification requirements respecting the exercise of a profession. It does not extend special privileges to spouses and members of the family. Their entry is governed by the provisions of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the Regulations.


    The temporary entry provisions of Chapter 16 of the NAFTA are restricted to citizens of the U.S., Mexico and Canada. In the case of the U.S., citizens of the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are covered by the NAFTA; however, citizens of Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands are excluded from the NAFTA. Permanent residents of the three countries are not covered. They are, however, covered by the general provisions governing the temporary entry of foreign workers.


    The following requirements apply:

    • citizenship of the U.S. or Mexico;
    • profession identified in Appendix 1603.D.1;
    • qualification to work in that profession (degree or certification in a related educational program);
    • pre-arranged employment with a Canadian employer;
    • provision of professional level services in the field of qualification as indicated in the Appendix; and
    • compliance with existing immigration requirements for temporary entry.

    The basic North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provisions remain the same in the Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement (CCFTA) and are set out in Chapter K of the CCFTA. There are, however, a number of minor differences, primarily in the appendices which support two of the categories of business persons - Business Visitors and Professionals. The rules for Intra-company transferrees and Traders/Investors are the same.


    Professionals identified in Appendix K-03.IV.1 of the CCFTA (below) seek entry through pre-arrangement – as a salaried employee under a personal contract with a Canadian employer or through a contract with the professional’s employer in their home country. Like the NAFTA list of Professionals in Appendix G of this manual, over 60 professionals are identified in the CCFTA list. Unlike Appendix K03.I.1 (Business Visitor), Appendix K-03.IV.1 below contains an exhaustive list of professionals and cannot be interpreted. Each professional identified in the Appendix must hold the qualifications indicated in the Minimum Educational Requirements and Alternative Credentials applicable to the profession. No new profession was added to the Appendix of the CCFTA. The requirements applicable to NAFTA professionals were retained and continue to apply for the Chilean professions. However, for 14 of the professions, Chilean minimum education requirements and alternative credentials, such as the Chilean University Title, were added as alternatives to the requirements which are set out in NAFTA, in order to reflect the Chilean educational system. Changes were made to the minimum education requirements and alternative credentials for the following professions : Accountant, Lawyer, Librarian, Social Worker, Dietitian, Nutritionist, Occupational Therapist, Physician, Physiotherapist, Registered Nurse, Veterinarian and Geologist.


    The Canada-Peru FTA was signed in 2008 and became effective August 1, 2009. Chapter 12 of the Agreement entitled Temporary Entry for Business Persons is modeled on the NAFTA but contains some differences. The inclusion of the permanent residents (not only citizens) of each country in the Canada-Peru FTA is different from the NAFTA (see section 1.6). Therefore, proof of permanent resident status is also an accepted document for presentation in support of an application


    Employed continuously by the enterprise for six months (versus one year for NAFTA) within the three-year period immediately preceding the date of application for admission; and the intra-company transferees category has expanded to include a new category of “management trainee on professional development”, meaning an employee with a post-secondary degree who is on a temporary work assignment intended to broaden that employee’s knowledge of and experience in a company in preparation for a senior leadership position within the company.


    Professionals are listed using a negative list, meaning that all professionals that meet the general definition of professionals are covered, except for the professionals which are excluded through specifiying in the applicable list.

    Note: Professional means a national of a Party who is engaged in a specialty occupation.

    A professional specialty occupation shall mean an occupation which falls within the National Occupation Classification (NOC) levels 0 and A. These requirements shall be those defined in the NOC. technicians are listed using a positive list, meaning that only those technicans included on the list of technicians are covered.


    The Canada-Colombia Free Trade Agreement (FTA) was signed in November 2008 and became effective August 15, 2011. The coverage of Chapter 12 of the Canada-Colombia FTA is almost identical to Chapter 12 of the Canada-Peru FTA, but includes a section allowing the issuance of open work permits to spouses of Traders and Investors, Intra-company Transferees or Professionals and Technicians. This is also different from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which did not cover spouses as noted in Section 1.5 of NAFTA.

    Coding for the spousal provision [T25] - As this is an exemption under a FTA, it is to be treated differently from the C41 and C42 (spouses of skilled-workers or students respectively) exemptions. Therefore, exemption code T25 is to be entered into the system for open work permit applications from spouses of workers coming in under the Canada-Colombia FTA.

    Professionals and Technicians - Please refer to the list of Professionals and Technicians in the Canada-Peru FTA section , as the Canada-Colombia FTA contains the identical list, and, like the Canada-Peru FTA, contains a list of professionals not covered followed by a list of technicians that are covered.


    This option is best suitable for those employers whose business is either in a remote location, and due to which they have difficulty of retaining the employees, or for employers where the positions need on-the-job training and if the employee does not qualify after the probation period, the employer needs to replace the position with a new candidate. Our company provides a "Replacement Option" in which for a small extra cost, we provide either an emergency replacement till we find a new candidate for our client. This service provides a peace of mind to the employers because the complete burden of recruiting and training for new workers falls on our shoulders. If you are interested in taking advantage of your services, please fill in the form below, and one of our Employment Specialist will contact you with a tailored solution suitable to your needs.


    54cab1f9c7b1fb7312fd4aaf_dreamstime_xs_15450102.jpg

    Complete the Job Description form, and submit to our professional staff, you will be contacted within 2 business days by our company with a solution Apply today!