• FEDERAL SKILLED WORKER - INTRODUCTION

    Until December 31, 2014, the process of applications was slightly different, all the occupational categories were divided in two groups, one group contained a list of those occupations (along with NOC) which were considered to be "more in demand" and candidates who had work experience in any of those "more in demand" occupations could apply, provided the application met the selection criteria (the famous six selection factors), scored 67 points and the quota for the category still had vacancies, when applying under this group, there was no requirement to have a valid job offer from a Canadian Employer (a valid job offer meant and still means a positive opinion from Service Canada about the Labour Market Impact Assessment, previously also known as Labour Market Opinion or Arranged Employment Opinion). Only a limited number of applications were accepted under each category per year.

    The second group had no quota, anyone who had a valid job offer from a Canadian Employer, (provided the job offer was in NOC 0, A or B level) could apply, still the applicant had to score a minimum of 67 points, but because of the valid job offer added 15 points in the total (10 for Arranged Employment and 5 under the Adaptability factor due to Arranged Employment) meeting the minimum score of 67 was easier for such applicants. And those candidates who were scoring less points in Age, Education or Language, could easily make their total as 67.

    For many years above system stayed in vogue, there were major complaints from candidates because the processing times were getting longer and longer. The increased waiting time put a lot of applications at stake, especially, those who applied with a valid job offer. The processing of the applications took a couple of years, so eventually the employers who initially showed intention to hire an individual started retrieving their offers.

    Discussions and preparations began to introduce a new more effective system. This system would reduce the processing time bringing talented professionals in Canada faster. Helping to assist the employer's needs and boost the Canadian Economy.

    Commencing January 2015, Canada introduced the Express Entry System, details about this system is available in our Express Entry section. All source material taken from the Canadian Official Website, and to ease this process we provide this information on our website.

    A Question arises, are the Express Entry and The Federal Skilled Worker Program separate programs?

    The simple answer is that they are the same. There is a stream of applications, and the first is the Express Entry. This is the intake of a basic application for the candidate to apply and must meet the basic criteria needed. Such as the application as a Federal Skilled worker, Trade Worker, Canadian Experience Class, and the Provincial Nominee Program. Hence this section is the Federal Skilled Worker Category.


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  • ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

    This section provides you a clear understanding about minimum threshold of different factors, please keep in mind, even if you have a Valid Job Offer (LMIA) which is bringing you additional points, but in order for you to qualify, you have to meet at least these Minimum Requirements


    Your work experience must be:

    • At least one year (1,560 hours total / 30 hours per week), continuous full-time or an equal amount in part-time,
    • At least one year (1,560 hours total / 30 hours per week), continuous full-time or an equal amount in part-time,
    • At least one year (1,560 hours total / 30 hours per week), continuous full-time or an equal amount in part-time,

    Full Time

    30 hours/week for 12 months = 1 year full time (1560 hours)

    Part time

    15 hours/week for 24 months = 1 year full time (1560 hours)

    OR

    30 hours/week for 12 months at more than one job = 1 year full time (1560 hours)


    You must show that you did the duties set out in the lead statement of the occupational description in the NOC, including all the essential duties and most of the main duties listed.(You can take assistance of our Career Development Professionals by sending your resume).If you cannot show that your work experience meets the description in the NOC, you are not eligible under this program. Its always a good support, when submitting your application, you should add your paystubs and proof of income tax paid (where applicable), to prove genuiness of your work experience.


    You must prove your ability in English or French in these four areas:

    • listening
    • speaking,
    • reading, and
    • writing.

    You must meet the minimum language levels, which are different depending on the program. You must meet the minimum level of Canadian Language Benchmark(CLB) 7 in English or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC) 7in French for your first official language in all four language abilities. To get points for your second official language, you must meet the minimum level of CLB 5 in all four language abilities. You must show that you meet the requirements in English or French by including the test results when you complete your Express Entry profile. Your test results must not be more than two years old on the day you apply for permanent residence.


    You must have:

    A Canadian secondary (high school) or post-secondary certificate, diploma or degree, or an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) report from an agency approved by CIC to show your foreign education is equal to Canadian education standards.

    An Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) is used to verify that your foreign degree, diploma, certificate (or other proof of your credential) is valid and equal to a Canadian one.


    If you have a Canadian degree, diploma or certificate, you do not need to get an ECA. You will need to get an ECA for your foreign degree, diploma or certificate if:

    1. You want to be considered for the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) under Express Entry
      • you are a principal applicant, and
      • you got your education outside Canada, or
    2. You are an Express Entry candidate (or their spouse or common-law partner coming with them to Canada) being considered for the Federal Skilled Trades Program or the Canadian Experience Class, and you want points for your foreign education.
    3. To be eligible under (a) or to get points under (b) you must include ECA results as part of your Express Entry profile.

      Note: An ECA can give you early feedback on how your credentials compare to those in Canada. It may also help when you are looking for a job. But, being assessed does not guarantee that:

      • you will get a job in your field or at a certain level,
      • your work experience and professional credentials are automatically recognized in Canada,
      • you will be licensed to practice in a regulated profession.

    If you plan to work in a regulated profession, you must still get your license in the province or territory that you plan on settling in.

    A regulatory authority will decide if you can be licensed in a profession. They will assess factors such as your education, experience/competencies and language skills, as well as other factors.

    You should contact the regulatory authority in the province where you plan to live as soon as possible. They can give you information about the process for being licensed, including steps you can take before you leave your home country.

    Our professional staff specializes in getting your foreign credentials assessed from the designated organizations, as well as we can also provide assistance in the steps for acquiring licenses in regulated professions. You can send your details to us.


    CIC will only accept an ECA from one of the organizations designated by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) You can contact us for assistance.

    The original ECA report must:

    • be issued on or after the date CIC-designated the organization,

    • not be more than five years old on the date that CIC gets a) your Express Entry profile, and b) your application for permanent residence, and

    • show your credential is equal to a completed Canadian one.

    Note: You will have to provide the reference number from the report in your Express Entry profile, as well as your application for permanent residence (along with proof of your foreign credential). If we cannot validate the number you enter, we will need you to provide an electronic copy to confirm. Keep a copy in case we need to see it.

    If you are invited to apply for permanent residence and do not include this assessment and proof of your foreign credential when you apply, your application is not complete and will not be accepted for processing. Any fees submitted will be returned and you will need to submit a new Express Entry profile to be considered in the future.

    Note: You must have completed the equivalent of at least a Canadian high school diploma to be eligible to apply as a federal skilled worker. Your ECA report must show that you meet this.

    Before you apply, check the ECA conversion table to confirm that the result on your ECA report matches one of the outcomes listed and to see how many points you would get for different credentials, based on the outcome statement included on your ECA report.

    If you meet all the conditions set out in the minimum requirements, CIC will assess your application based on the selection factors in the federal skilled worker points grid.


    The selection factors are:

    your skills in English and/or French (Canada's two official languages),

    your education,

    your work experience,

    your age,

    whether you have a valid job offer, and

    your adaptability (how well you are likely to settle here).

    CIC assesses federal skilled worker applications based on six selection factors. If you score 67 points or higher (out of 100), you may qualify to immigrate to Canada as a federal skilled worker. If you score lower than the pass mark of 67 points, you will not qualify to immigrate to Canada as a federal skilled worker. It is better not to apply at this time.


    Being able to communicate and work in one or both of Canada’s official languages is very important. Knowing English, French or both helps you in the Canadian job market. You can get up to 28 points for your skills in English and French. You will be given points based on your ability to:

    • listen
    • speak
    • read and
    • write

    Language Testing

    You must prove the language levels you claim on your application with a language test from an agency approved by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC).You will not get an invitation to apply if you do not include language test results for either English or French that show you meet the required level.If you want to get points for your skills in both English and French, you must provide your language test results for each language at the same time. Once you take this test, you can use it to see exactly how many points you will get for the language selection factor.

    Calculate Your Language Points

    You must meet the minimum level of CLB 7; for your first official language in all four language areas.

    To get points for your second official language, you must meet the minimum level of CLB 5; in all four language areas.

    Please Note: You can only get points for your second official language if you meet the threshold of CLB 5 in all four language abilities (speaking, listening, reading and writing). You can score four points for your second official language skills.

    Note: You can only get four points in total for basic-level skills in your second official language, and only if you have a score of at least CLB 5 in each of the four language abilities.


    You can earn selection points for your education. To get points, you must:

    • prove that you earned a Canadian diploma or certificate, OR
    • have your foreign education assessed by an agency approved by CIC to show it is valid and equal to a completed Canadian credential.

    You must include your Canadian credential or your foreign credential and Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) report when you apply.


    You can get points for the number of years you have spent in full-time paid work (at least 30 hours per week, or an equal amount of part-time).

    National Occupational Classification (NOC)

    The NOC is a system used to classify jobs in the Canadian economy. It describes duties, skills, talents and work settings for different jobs. CIC uses the 2011 edition of the NOC to assess skilled worker applications.

    Finding your NOC category

    This job code is referred to as your "NOC code" in the Express Entry profile. You will need this information again, so make sure to write it down and keep it with the other papers you need, such as your passport.

    If the description and list of main duties match what you did at your last job(s), you can count this experience for points.


    You will get the points for Age, based on the date your application reaches to Centralized Intake Office.


    (Maximum 10 points + another 5 points are awarded for Arranged employment in Adaptability Section)

    In some cases, you can get points if you have a permanent, full-time job offer from a Canadian employer. The job must be arranged before you apply to come to Canada as a federal skilled worker.

    A valid job offer has to be:

    for full-time, permanent and not seasonal work,

    and

    in an occupation listed as Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A or B of the National Occupational Classification (NOC)


    If you have a spouse or common law partner who will immigrate with you to Canada, they can earn points for adaptability too. You can only get points for each item once. This include your or your spouse’s past education or work experience in Canada; relatives in Canada, Language and Education of your spouse, and Arranged Employment (if applicable)

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  • UNDERSTANDING THE NOC

    You may have seen the term “NOC” on this site. It is short for the National Occupational Classification (NOC).

    The NOC is a system used by the Government of Canada to classify jobs (occupations). Jobs are grouped based on the type of work a person does and the types of job duties.

    Many of Canada’s immigration programs use it to decide if a job, or type of work experience, is valid for that program’s criteria. For instance, if a person wants to apply as a skilled worker they should check the NOC to see which jobs are considered “skilled” (NOC Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A or B). Find your job title, code and skill level or type.

    There are some codes used only in specific immigration cases. If you can’t find the NOC for your case in the table below or on the NOC website,

    The job information is broken down into a number of groups. For immigration purposes, the main groups are:

    1. Skill Type 0 (zero) – management jobs.
      • examples: restaurant managers, mine managers, shore captains (fishing)
    2. Skill Level A — professional jobs. People usually need a degree from a university for these jobs.
      • examples: doctors, dentists, architects
    3. Skill Level B — technical jobs and skilled trades. People usually need a college diploma or to train as an apprentice to do these jobs.
      • examples: chefs, electricians, plumbers
    4. Skill Level C — intermediate jobs. These jobs usually need high school and/or job-specific training.
      • examples: long-haul truck drivers, butchers, food and beverage servers
    5. Skill Level D — labour jobs. On-the-job training is usually given.
      • examples: cleaning staff, oil field workers, fruit pickers

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  • HOW EXPRESS ENTRY WORKS – FEDERAL SKILLED WORKER CATEGORY

    1. You will need to take a language test. We will use your test results to see if you are eligible to immigrate to Canada under one of the federal programs that are part of Express Entry.
    2. If you were educated outside Canada, you may need to have your educational credentials assessed against Canadian standards.
    3. This is not mandatory if:
      • you got at least one year of recent work experience in Canada, or
      • your work experience is in a skilled trade (skilled manual work).

      Note: Even if you do not need to have your foreign education assessed to be eligible under Express Entry, you may want to do so in order to increase your score and chances of being invited to apply.

    4. You need to know the skill type of the job your work experience is in (as well as the job you plan to have in Canada, if they are different). You will use Canada’s job classification system (the National Occupational Classification or NOC) to find out whether your work experience is valid under one of the three federal programs.

    This job code is referred to as your "NOC code" in the Express Entry profile.

    You will need this information again, so make sure to write it down and keep it with the other papers you need, such as your passport.


    You can use CIC online tool, Come to Canada, to see if you meet the criteria to get into the Express Entry pool. It will take you about 15 minutes.

    You will need your language test results, your NOC skill type or level described above and your Education Credential Assessment (ECA).

    When you get to the end, a reference number will show on the screen. Write it down. You will need it later when you go to build your profile.


    If you get a positive result from Come to Canada, it will send you to your account. If you do not already have an account, you will need to create one. Then you will fill out an Express Entry profile to tell CIC about your:

    • identity
    • contact information
    • education in more detail
    • work experience in more detail
    • language
    • family who would come with you to Canada (dependants)

    You will need:

    • your passport or travel document (or other national identity document, if you do not have one of these)
    • your NOC job title and code (see Before you start, above)
    • your language test results (either IELTS, CELPIP or TEF)
    • your Educational Credential Assessment result, if you have one (see Before you start, above)
    • a copy of your written job offer from an employer in Canada, if you have one
    • a copy of your provincial nomination, if you have one, and
    • your personal reference code from the Come to Canada tool, if you have one. (It looks like this: JM1234567890. We use it to bring the answers you provided in the tool into your account so you do not have to answer the questions again. If you go to the profile builder directly through your account, you will not have one.)
    1. Follow the instructions to create an account if you do not already have one. The system will give you a number that you will use each time you sign in.
    2. If you have a personal reference code from the Come to Canada tool, enter it when it prompts you. If you do not have a code, go to Step 3.
    3. Enter your personal details, work experience, education, etc.
    4. (Note: You may exit the profile at any time. Your information will be saved. But, if you do not complete the Express Entry profile in 90 days, you will not be able to submit it and will have to start again.)

    5. Submit your profile online.

    If you meet the Express Entry criteria, including the requirements for at least one of the three immigration programs, you will be accepted into the Express Entry pool of candidates. If you are invited to apply for permanent residence, we will tell you at that time which program to apply under.

    Important: Submitting an Express Entry profile does not mean you have applied for permanent residence, or that you will be invited to. If we invite you to apply, you will then need to give us more information in your application for permanent residence.

    Consider registering with Job Bank

    Note: It is now optional to create a Job Match account with Job Bank.

    If you are in the Express Entry pool, you can start your job search by creating a Job Match account with Job Bank. Once you come to Canada, you can continue using Job Bank to find a job.

    A Job Match account with Job Bank is an easy, online tool to help match you with employers looking for workers with your skills. To create an account:

    • go to the Job Match sign-in page
    • click the “Sign up now!” button
    • read the privacy notice and click “I agree”
    • follow the instructions to create an account

    The Express Entry pool

    If you meet the requirements, we will place you into the Express Entry pool of candidates. You will get a message in your account to let you know.

    You will be given a score using a ranking system based on factors that have been shown to help immigrants prosper in Canada. The higher your score, the more likely you are to be invited to apply for permanent residence. We plan to issue Invitations to Apply to candidates from the pool regularly.

    If you are accepted into the Express Entry pool, you should start getting any supporting documents you may need for your application for permanent residence. You could get an invitation to apply at any time.

    You will have a better chance of being invited to apply if you:

    • are nominated by a province or territory, or
    • have a valid job offer from an employer in Canada.

    You will get extra points for these factors.

    Note: you must update the information in your profile if your situation changes. For example, if:

    • there are changes to your work experience.
    • you get a different language test result,
    • you complete more education,
    • there is a change in your family, such as the birth of a child or a divorce, or
    • one of your children is no longer a dependent (including if they turn 19 during this time).

    If you get an invitation to apply, you can apply for permanent residence. You will be invited only if you:

    • have been nominated by a province or territory, or
    • are among the top ranked in the pool based on your skills and experience.

    If you are invited, you will have 90 days to apply online for permanent residence.

    You must submit a complete application with all supporting documents or we will reject your application.

    Once you complete your application and submit it online, we will process it quickly. We process most applications through Express Entry in six months or less. (This period starts on the date we get a complete application and ends on the date a final decision is made.)

    You will have to include copies of all documents we ask you for, like police certificates, before we will process your application. To keep your application from being rejected, you may want to get some of these documents ready while you are in the Express Entry pool.

    Skilled work experience

    Your work experience must be:

    • in the same type of job as your primary NOC
    • within the last 10 years
    • paid work (volunteer work, unpaid internships don’t count)
    • at skill type 0, or skill levels A or B of the 2011 National Occupational Classification (NOC)
      • at least 1 year (1,560 hours total / 30 hours per week), continuous:
      • full-time at 1 job: 30 hours/week for 12 months = 1 year full time (1,560 hours)
      • equal amount in part-time: 15 hours/week for 24 months = 1 year full time (1,560 hours)
    • full-time at more than 1 job: 30 hours/week for 12 months at more than 1 job = 1 year full time (1,560 hours)

    You must show that you did the duties set out in the lead statement of the occupational description in the NOC, including all the essential duties and most of the main duties listed.

    If you cannot show that your work experience meets the description in the NOC, you are not eligible under this program.


    You must:

    • meet the minimum language level of Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 7, and
    • take a language test approved by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) that shows you meet the level for speaking, listening, reading and writing.

    You must show that you meet the requirements in English or French by including the test results when you complete your Express Entry profile. Your test results must not be more than two years old on the day you apply for permanent residence.


    You must have:

    • a Canadian secondary (high school) or post-secondary certificate, diploma or degree,
    • OR

    • a completed foreign credential, and
    • an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) report from an agency approved by CIC. [The report must show your foreign education is equal to a completed Canadian secondary (high school) or post-secondary certificate, diploma or degree.]

    Six selection factors


    If you meet all the conditions set out in the minimum requirements, we will assess your application based on the selection factors in the federal skilled worker points grid.Footnote1

    The selection factors are:

    • your skills in English and/or French (Canada’s two official languages),
    • your education,
    • your work experience,
    • your age,
    • whether you have a valid job offer, and
    • your adaptability (how well you are likely to settle here).

    To see how many points you might get,


    You must show that you have enough money to support yourself and your family after you arrive in Canada, unless you:

    • are currently able to legally work in Canada, and
    • have a valid job offer from an employer in Canada.

    If you are married or live with a common-law foreign national partner in Canada, and that person also meets the above conditions, you can decide which one of you will apply under Express Entry as a principal applicant.

    A common-law partner is a person who has lived with you in a conjugal relationship for at least one year. Common-law partner refers to both opposite-sex and same-sex couples.

    Look at each selection factor and see which one of you is most likely to meet the eligibility requirements and earn the most points. That person should apply as the principal applicant.


    1. You must be admissible to Canada. Find out more about inadmissibility.
    2. You must plan to live outside the province of Quebec.

    Once you’re in the pool: skilled immigrants (Express Entry)


    We’ll put you in the Express Entry pool of candidates if we find your Express Entry profile eligible. You’ll be in the pool for one year from the day you get in.

    We’ll give you points based on the information you provided in your profile (skills and experience). We’ll rank you using the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS).

    There will be regular rounds to invite the top-ranked candidates in the pool to apply for permanent residence. We may invite you to apply if you’re among them.

    You must have an invitation to apply before you can apply online for permanent residence.

    Make sure that you give us a valid email address. To invite you to apply for permanent residence, we’ll send a message to:

    • your account
    • your personal email address

    Note: It is now optional to create a Job Match account with Job Bank.

    If you are in the Express Entry pool, you can start your job search by creating a Job Match account with Job Bank. Once you come to Canada, you can continue using Job Bank to find a job.

    A Job Match account with Job Bank is an easy, online tool to help match you with employers looking for workers with your skills. To create an account:

    • go to the Job Match sign-in page
    • click the “Sign up now!” button
    • read the privacy notice and click “I agree”
    • follow the instructions to create an account

    If we don’t invite you to apply for permanent residence after a year of being in the pool, your Express Entry profile will expire.

    • If you still want to come to Canada as a skilled immigrant, you’ll need to complete and submit a new profile.
    • If you meet minimum entry criteria, we’ll give you a new Express Entry Profile Number.

    Get your application for permanent residence ready

    If we invite you to apply, you will have 90 days to fill out and submit your application. Some documents (for example, police certificates) may take longer than 90 days to get. You should start applying for these documents right away, so that you have them ready and can apply within the 90-day time limit.

    Try to improve your score

    There are things that you can do to improve your score and increase your chances of being invited to apply. For example, you may want to:

    • secure a valid job offer using:
      • Job Bank, or
      • by promoting yourself to employers in Canada using private sector job boards,
    • contact provinces and territories to be considered in a Provincial Nominee Program,
    • improve your language score,
    • improve your education, or
    • gain more relevant work experience.

    Be sure that your profile is fully up-to-date and accurate.

    If we invite you to apply, you will be responsible for any information in your profile and application for permanent residence.

    If we find that you misrepresented yourself (gave us false information or left out important details), we will refuse your application. In that case:

    • your application could be refused,
    • you could be found inadmissible, and
    • you could be barred for five years from applying to come to Canada for any reason.
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  • COMPREHENSIVE RANKING SYSTEM (CRS)

    The Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) is the points-based system we use to assess and score your profile and rank you in the Express Entry pool.

    The CRS gives you a score from your profile answers, including your:

    • skills
    • education
    • language ability
    • work experience
    • other factors

    The CRS also gives you points for:

    • Canadian degrees, diplomas or certificates
    • a valid job offer
    • a nomination from a province or territory

    We regularly send invitations to apply to the highest-ranking candidates in the pool. If you are invited, you can apply to immigrate as a permanent resident.


    The points you get from the CRS include a core set of points up to 600 and a set of additional points of up to 600. Your total score will be out of 1,200. It is based on the four parts of the CRS formula:

    Core: Up to 600 points

    1. Skills and experience factors
    2. Spouse or common-law partner factors, such as their language skills and education
    3. Skills transferability, including education and work experience
    4. Additional: Up to 600 points for:
      • Canadian degrees, diplomas or certificates
      • a valid job offer
      • a nomination from a province or territory

    Core points + Additional points = Your total score

    A. Single candidates B. Candidates spouses or common-law partners that will come with them to Canada (The maximum number of points is the same no matter the person’s marital status)
    Core
    1. Skills and experience factors (maximum 500)+ 1. Skills and experience factors (maximum 460)+
    2. N/A+ 2. Spouse or common-law partner factors (maximum 40)+
    3. Skill transferability factors (maximum 100) + 3. Skill transferability factors (maximum 100) +
    Additional
    4. points (maximum 600) 4. points (maximum 600)
    Grand total (maximum 1,200) Grand total (maximum 1,200)


    A. Core / human capital factors
    Factors Points per factor - With a spouse or common-law partner Points per factor - Without a spouse or common-law partner
    Age 100 110
    Level of education 140 150
    Official languages proficiency 150 160
    Canadian work experience 70 80
    B. Spouse or common-law partner factors
    Factors Points per factor (Maximum 40 points)
    Level of education 10
    Official language proficiency 20
    Canadian Work Experience 10

    A. Core/human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner + C. Transferability factors = Maximum 600 points

    C. Skill Transferability factors (Maximum 100 points)
    Education Points per factor(Maximum 50 points)
    With good/strong official languages proficiency and a post-secondary degree 50
    With Canadian work experience and a post-secondary degree 50
    Foreign Work Experience Points per factor(Maximum 50 points)
    With good/strong official languages proficiency (Canadian Language Benchmark [CLB] level 7 or higher) and foreign work experience 50
    With Canadian work experience and foreign work experience 50
    Certificate of qualification (for people in trade occupations) Points per factor(Maximum 50 points)
    With good/strong official languages proficiency and a certificate of qualification 50

    A. Core/human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner + C. Transferability factors = Maximum 600 points

    D. Additional points (Maximum 600 points)
    Factor Maximum points per factor
    Brother or sister living in Canada (citizen or permanent resident) 15
    French language skills 30
    Post-secondary education in Canada 30
    Arranged employment 200
    PN nomination 600

    A. Core/human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner factors + C. Transferability factors + D. Additional points = Grand total – Maximum 1,200 points

    Points breakdown, section by section

    CRS – A. Core / human capital factors

    • With a spouse or common-law partner: Maximum 460 points total for all factors.
    • Without a spouse or common-law partner: Maximum 500 points total for all factors.
    Age With a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 100 points) Without a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 110 points)
    17 years of age or less 0 0
    18 years of age 90 99
    19 years of age 95 105
    20 to 29 years of age 100 110
    30 years of age 95 105
    31 years of age 90 99
    32 years of age 85 94
    33 years of age 80 88
    34 years of age 75 83
    35 years of age 70 77
    36 years of age 65 72
    37 years of age 60 66
    38 years of age 55 61
    39 years of age 50 55
    40 years of age 45 50
    41 years of age 35 39
    42 years of age 25 28
    43 years of age 15 17
    44 years of age 5 6
    45 years of age 0 0
    Level of Education With a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 140 points) Without a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 150 points)
    Less than secondary school (high school) 0 0
    Secondary diploma (high school graduation) 28 30
    One-year degree, diploma or certificate from a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 84 90
    Two-year program at a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 91 98
    Bachelor's degree OR a three or more year program at a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 112 120
    Two or more certificates, diplomas, or degrees. One must be for a program of three or more years 119 128
    Master's degree, OR professional degree needed to practice in a licensed profession (For “professional degree,” the degree program must have been in: medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, optometry, law, chiropractic medicine, or pharmacy.) 126 135
    Doctoral level university degree (Ph.D.) 140 150

    Maximum points for each ability (reading, writing, speaking and listening):

    • 32 with a spouse or common-law partner
    • 34 without a spouse or common-law partner
    Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level per ability With a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 128 points) Without a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 136 points)
    Less than CLB 4 0 0
    CLB 4 or 5 6 6
    CLB 6 8 9
    CLB 7 16 17
    CLB 8 22 23
    CLB 9 29 31
    CLB 10 or more 32 34

    Official languages proficiency - second official language

    Maximum points for each ability (reading, writing, speaking and listening):

    • 6 with a spouse or common-law partner (up to a combined maximum of 22 points)
    • 6 without a spouse or common-law partner (up to a combined maximum of 24 points)
    Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level per ability With a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 22 points) Without a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 24 points)
    CLB 4 or less 0 0
    CLB 5 or 6 1 1
    CLB 6 3 3
    CLB 7 6 6
    Canadian work experience With a spouse or common-law partner (Maximum 70 points) Without a spouse or common-law partner (Maximum 80 points)
    Non or less than a year 0 0
    1 year 35 40
    2 year 46 53
    3 year 56 64
    4 year 63 72
    5 year or more 70 80

    Subtotal: A. Core / human capital factors

    • With a spouse or common-law partner – Maximum 460 points
    • Without a spouse or common-law partner – Maximum 500 points

    CRS – B. Spouse or common-law partner factors (if applicable)

    Spouse’s or common-law partner’s level of education With spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 10 points) Without spouse or common-law partner(Does not apply)
    Less than secondary school (high school) 0 n/a
    Secondary school (high school graduation) 2 n/a
    One-year program at a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 6 n/a
    Two-year program at a university, college, trade or technical in school, or other institute 7 n/a
    Bachelor's degree OR a three or more year program at a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 8 n/a
    Two or more certificates, diplomas, or degrees. One must be for a program of three or more years 9 n/a
    Master's degree, or professional degree needed to practice in a licensed profession (For “professional degree”, the degree program must have been in: medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, optometry, law, chiropractic medicine, or pharmacy.) 10 n/a
    Doctoral level university degree (PhD) 10 n/a

    Note: (n/a) means that this factor does not apply in this case.

    Spouse's or common-law partner's official languages proficiency - first official language

    Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level per ability (reading, writing, speaking and listening ) Maximum 20 points for section Maximum 5 points per ability Without spouse or common-law partner (Does not apply)
    CLB 4 or less 0 n/a
    CLB 5 or 6 1 n/a
    CLB 7 or 8 3 n/a
    CLB 9 or above 5 n/a

    Note: (n/a) means that this factor does not apply in this case.

    Spouse's Canadian work experience Maximum 10 points Without spouse or common-law partner (Does not apply)
    None or less than a year 0 n/a
    1 year 5 n/a
    2 year 7 n/a
    3 year 8 n/a
    4 year 9 n/a
    5 year 10 n/a

    Note: (n/a) means that this factor does not apply in this case.

    Subtotal : A. Core / human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner factors = Maximum 500 points

    CRS – C. Skill transferability factors (Maximum 100 points for this section)



    With good official language proficiency (Canadian Language Benchmark Level [CLB] 7 or higher) and a post-secondary degree Points for CLB 7 or more on all first official language abilities, with one or more under CLB 9 (Maximum 25 points) Points for CLB 9 or more on all four first official language abilities (Maximum 50 points)
    Secondary school (high school) credential or less 0 0
    Post-secondary program credential of one year or longer 13 25
    Two or more post-secondary program credentials AND at least one of these credentials was issued on completion of a post-secondary program of three years or longer 25 50
    With Canadian work experience and a post-secondary degree Points for education + 1 year of Canadian work experience (Maximum 25 points) Points for education + 2 years or more of Canadian work experience (Maximum 50 points)
    Secondary school (high school) credential or less 0 0
    Post-secondary program credential of one year or longer 13 25
    Two or more post-secondary program credentials AND at least one of these credentials was issued on completion of a post-secondary program of three years or longer 25 50

    Foreign work experience – With good official language proficiency (Canadian Language Benchmark Level [CLB] 7 or higher)

    Years of experience Points for foreign work experience + CLB 7 or more on all first official language abilities, one or more under 9 (Maximum 25 points) Points for foreign work experience + CLB 9 or more on all four first official language abilities (Maximum 50 points)
    No foreign work experience 0 0
    1 or 2 years of foreign work experience 13 25
    3 years or more of foreign work experience 25 50

    Foreign work experience – With Canadian work experience

    Years of experience Points for foreign work experience + 1 year of Canadian work experience(Maximum 25 points) Points for foreign work experience + 2 years or more of Canadian work experience (Maximum 50 points)
    No foreign work experience 0 0
    1 or 2 years of foreign work experience 13 25
    3 years or more of foreign work experience 25 50
    Certificate of qualification (trade occupations) – With good official language proficiency (Canadian Language Benchmark Level [CLB] 5 or higher) Points for certificate of qualification + CLB 5 or more on all first official language abilities, one or more under 7 (Maximum 25 points) Points for certificate of qualification + CLB 7 or more on all four first official language abilities (Maximum 50 points)
    With a certificate of qualification 25 50

    Subtotal: A. Core / human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner + C. Skill transferability factors - Maximum 600 points

    CRS – D. Additional points (Maximum 600 points)

    Additional points Maximum 600 points
    Brother or sister living in Canada who is a citizen or permanent resident of Canada 15
    Scored NCLC 7 or higher on all four French language skills and scored CLB 4 or lower in English (or didn’t take an English test) 15
    Scored NCLC 7 or higher on all four French language skills and scored CLB 5 or higher on all four English skills 30
    Post-secondary education in Canada - credential of one or two years 15
    Post-secondary education in Canada - credential three years or longer 30
    Arranged employment - NOC 00 200
    Arranged employment – any other NOC 0, A or B 50
    Provincial or territorial nomination 600

    Subtotal: D. Additional points – Maximum 600 points

    Grand total: A. Core / human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner + C. Skill transferability factors + D. Additional points = Maximum 1,200 points


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  • INVITATION TO APPLY (ITA)


    If you are invited to apply for permanent residence, you will need to show proof of the information you gave us in your Express Entry profile. We will refuse your application if the information in your profile is different from what you submitted in your application.

    If we invite you to apply, you will get a message in your account telling you:

    • which program you are invited under, and
    • what to do next.
    • If we find that you misrepresented yourself (gave us false information or left out important details), we will refuse your application. In that case:

    • your application could be refused,
    • you could be found inadmissible, and
    • you could be barred for five years from applying to come to Canada for any reason.

    You should start to get your documents ready as soon as you are accepted into the Express Entry pool.

    If we invite you to apply, you will have 90 days to fill out your application for permanent residence and submit all supporting documents. Having your documents ready will make it easier to apply within the 90 days.


    Check that your language test results will still be valid on the date you plan to apply for permanent residence. If your results expire before then, you should:

    • be tested again,
    • apply before your test results expire, or
    • decline the invitation and go back into the pool to be considered in the future.

    If you apply for permanent residence with language test results that have expired, we will refuse your application.

    If you submit more than one valid test, we will use the test with the highest scores to assess your application.


    You will need to get police certificates for you and each of your family members who are over 18. You must get one from each country or territory where you have spent six or more months since the age of 18.

    For countries where you have lived for six months or more, the police certificate must be issued after the last time you lived in that country.

    In some countries, it can take a long time to get police certificates. If you did not start the process to get them before you were invited to apply, you should do this right away, so you can submit them before the 90 days are up.


    You can check the criteria for the program you have been directed to apply under to see if you are still eligible.

    By understanding your program requirements, you will be more prepared to apply to Citizenship and Immigration Canada. It will also help you decide whether or not to accept an invitation to apply if you are issued one.


    If your situation (or that of your spouse or partner) changes, you should re-calculate your score before applying online for permanent residence.

    If your recalculated score is less than the lowest score in your round of invitations for an invitation to apply, you should decline the invitation.

    Warning: In this case, if you decide to apply, we may refuse your application and will not refund your application fee.

    Some examples of changes which could lower your score:

    • you no longer have a valid job offer
    • you no longer have a provincial nomination
    • your language test scores have expired, or you re-took them and they are lower

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  • IMPROVING YOUR SCORE

    There are things that you can do to improve your score and increase your chances of being invited to apply. For example, you may want to:

    • secure a valid job offer using:
      • Job Bank, or
      • by promoting yourself to employers in Canada using private sector job boards,
    • contact provinces and territories to be considered in a Provincial Nominee Program,
    • improve your language score,
    • improve your education, or
    • gain more relevant work experience.

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