• On June 19, 2014, applications still in the backlog of the federal Immigrant Investor Program and Entrepreneur Program were terminated. Find out how you may be affected.

    The Quebec Investor Program and the Quebec Entrepreneur Program are not affected.

    The Immigrant Investor Program (IIP) aims to have experienced business people contribute to Canada’s growth and long-term prosperity by investing in Canada’s economy. Investors must:

    • show that they have business experience
    • have a net worth of at least C$1,600,000 that was gained legally and
    • invest C$800,000.

    Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) will divide your investment between participating provinces and territories. They will use it for projects to develop their economies and create jobs for five years.

    Your investment is guaranteed. CIC will return it, without interest, about five years and three months after payment.

    If we approve your application, you must make your investment before we issue a permanent resident visa. You must usually do this within 30 days. The visa office will send you a letter that explains what to do. Learn more about making your investment

    Check processing times

    Find out how long it will take CIC to process your application.

    After you apply: Next steps

    Learn what you should do after you apply to come to Canada.

    Prepare for arrival

    Be prepared and know what to expect when you arrive in Canada


    54cab1f9c7b1fb7312fd4aaf_dreamstime_xs_15450102.jpg

    Complete this form, and submit to our professional staff, you will be contacted within 2 business days by our company with a solution Apply today!


  • Canada's Start-up Visa Program targets immigrant entrepreneurs with the skills and potential to build businesses in Canada that:

    • are innovative
    • can create jobs for Canadians
    • can compete on a global scale

    Do you have an innovative business idea? If you can get support for your idea from one of the designated organizations, you may be able to immigrate to Canada.

    There are many reasons why Canada is the best place to build your business. Canada's advantages include:

    • a strong economy
    • low taxes
    • low business costs
    • excellence in research and innovation
    • a high quality of life

    Find out if you’re eligible – Start-up Visa Program

    To be eligible for the Start-up Visa Program, you must:


    Before you can apply for the Start-up Visa Program, you must have the support of a designated organization. These are business groups that have been approved to invest in or support possible start-ups.

    If a designated organization decides to support your business, it will give you a Letter of Support.

    You must include the Letter of Support with your application. If you do not include the letter or do not meet any of the requirements below, we will refuse your application.


    Up to five people can apply for the Start-up Visa Program as owners of a single business. However, to meet the ownership requirements:

    • each applicant must hold at least 10 percent of the voting rights in the business and
    • the designated organization and the applicants must jointly hold more than 50 per cent of the voting rights in the business.

    Note: Voting rights are the right of a business owner to vote within a company. The right to vote is attached to each share of a business that is outstanding at a given time.


    The ability to communicate and work in English, French, or both will help your business succeed in Canada.

    You must take a language test from an approved agency and include the results with your application, or we will not process it.

    You must meet the minimum level of the Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 5 in either English or French in all of these four areas:

    • speaking
    • reading
    • listening
    • writing

    If you do not meet the minimum language skills, we will refuse your application.


    The Government of Canada does not give financial support to new Start-up Visa immigrants.

    You must show that you have enough money to support yourself and your dependants after you arrive in Canada. You cannot borrow this money from another person. You will need to give proof that you have the money when you apply.

    The amount you will need depends on the size of your family. We update these amounts every year.

    Number of Family Members Funds Required (in Canadian dollars)
    1 $12,300
    2 $15,312
    3 $18,825
    4 $22,856
    5 $25,923
    6 $29,236
    7 $32,550
    For each additional family member $3,314

    If you are bringing more than CAN $10,000 across the Canadian border, you must tell a Canadian official when you arrive. If you do not, you may be fined, and your funds could be seized. These funds could be in the form of:

    • cash
    • securities that belong to you (for example, stocks, bonds, debentures, treasury bills) or
    • bankers' drafts, cheques, travellers' cheques or money order

    54cab1f9c7b1fb7312fd4aaf_dreamstime_xs_15450102.jpg

    Complete this form, and submit to our professional staff, you will be contacted within 2 business days by our company with a solution Apply today!


  • The intra-company category permits international companies to temporarily transfer qualified employees to Canada for the purpose of improving management effectiveness, expanding Canadian exports, and enhancing competitiveness in overseas markets.

    The entry of intra-company transferees is guided by the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations and the general provisions of this section, and is supplemented by provisions contained in international trade agreements for citizens of signatory countries.

    • Qualified intra-company transferees require work permits and are exempted from the Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) under paragraph R205(a) (exemption code C12) as they provide significant economic benefit to Canada through the transfer of their expertise to Canadian businesses. This applies to foreign nationals from any country, including under the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS).
    • Paragraph R204(a) provides for LMIA exemption code T24 for qualified intra-company transferees who are citizens of a country that has signed a free trade agreement (FTA) with Canada, namely NAFTA (and similar FTAs), and supplements the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act general provisions.

    Source:https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/publications-manuals/operational-bulletins-manuals/temporary-residents/foreign-workers/exemption-codes/intra-company-transferees.html



    Intra-company transferees may apply for work permits under the general provision if they

    • are currently employed by a multi-national company and seeking entry to work in a parent, a subsidiary, a branch, or an affiliate of that enterprise;
    • are transferring to an enterprise that has a qualifying relationship with the enterprise in which they are currently employed, and will be undertaking employment at a legitimate and continuing establishment of that company (where 18–24 months can be used as a reasonable minimum guideline);
    • are being transferred to a position in an executive, senior managerial, or specialized knowledge capacity;
    • are coming to Canada for a temporary period only;
    • comply with all immigration requirements for temporary entry.
    • The company where and to, the worker is transferred should meet the guidelines

    • Generally, the company must secure physical premises to house the Canadian operation, particularly in the case of specialized knowledge. However, in specific cases involving senior managers or executives, it would be acceptable that the address of the new start-up not yet be secured; for example, the company may use its counsel’s address until the executive can purchase or lease a premise.
    • The company must furnish realistic plans to staff the new operation.
    • The company must have the financial ability to commence business in Canada and compensate employees.
    • When transferring executives or managers, the company must
      • demonstrate that it will be large enough to support executive or management function.
    • When transferring a specialized knowledge worker, the company must
      • demonstrate that it is expected to be doing business;
      • ensure that work is guided and directed by management at the Canadian operation.


    The following documentation is required:

    • confirmation that the foreign national is currently employed by a multi-national enterprise outside Canada, and seeking entry to work in a parent, subsidiary, branch, or affiliate of that enterprise in Canada;
    • confirmation that the foreign national has been employed (via payroll or by contract) continuously (full-time, not accumulated part-time) by the enterprise outside Canada, in a similar full-time position, for at least one year within the three-year period immediately preceding the date of initial application;
    • outline of the applicant’s position in an executive or managerial capacity or one involving specialized knowledge (i.e. position, title, place in the organization, job description);
    • in the case of “specialized knowledge”, evidence that the person has such knowledge and that the position in Canada requires such knowledge;
    • outline of the position in Canada (namely, position, title, place in the organization, job description);
    • indication of intended duration of stay; and
    • description of the relationship between the enterprise in Canada and the enterprise in the foreign country (the officer may request tangible proof to establish the relationship between the Canadian and foreign organization wishing to make the transfer).

    Source:https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/publications-manuals/operational-bulletins-manuals/temporary-residents/foreign-workers/exemption-codes/intra-company-transferees.html



  • Introduction

    The intra-company category permits international companies to temporarily transfer qualified employees to Canada for the purpose of improving management effectiveness, expanding Canadian exports, and enhancing competitiveness in overseas markets.

    The entry of intra-company transferees is guided by the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations and the general provisions of this section, and is supplemented by provisions contained in international trade agreements for citizens of signatory countries.

    • Qualified intra-company transferees require work permits and are exempted from the Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) under paragraph R205(a) (exemption code C12) as they provide significant economic benefit to Canada through the transfer of their expertise to Canadian businesses. This applies to foreign nationals from any country, including under the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS).
    • Paragraph R204(a) provides for LMIA exemption code T24 for qualified intra-company transferees who are citizens of a country that has signed a free trade agreement (FTA) with Canada, namely NAFTA (and similar FTAs), and supplements the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act general provisions.

    Source:https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/publications-manuals/operational-bulletins-manuals/temporary-residents/foreign-workers/exemption-codes/intra-company-transferees.html



    Intra-company transferees may apply for work permits under the general provision if they

    • are currently employed by a multi-national company and seeking entry to work in a parent, a subsidiary, a branch, or an affiliate of that enterprise;
    • are transferring to an enterprise that has a qualifying relationship with the enterprise in which they are currently employed, and will be undertaking employment at a legitimate and continuing establishment of that company (where 18–24 months can be used as a reasonable minimum guideline);
    • are being transferred to a position in an executive, senior managerial, or specialized knowledge capacity;
    • are coming to Canada for a temporary period only;
    • comply with all immigration requirements for temporary entry.
    • The company where and to, the worker is transferred should meet the guidelines

    • Generally, the company must secure physical premises to house the Canadian operation, particularly in the case of specialized knowledge. However, in specific cases involving senior managers or executives, it would be acceptable that the address of the new start-up not yet be secured; for example, the company may use its counsel’s address until the executive can purchase or lease a premise.
    • The company must furnish realistic plans to staff the new operation.
    • The company must have the financial ability to commence business in Canada and compensate employees.
    • When transferring executives or managers, the company must
      • demonstrate that it will be large enough to support executive or management function.
    • When transferring a specialized knowledge worker, the company must
      • demonstrate that it is expected to be doing business;
      • ensure that work is guided and directed by management at the Canadian operation.


    The following documentation is required:

    • confirmation that the foreign national is currently employed by a multi-national enterprise outside Canada, and seeking entry to work in a parent, subsidiary, branch, or affiliate of that enterprise in Canada;
    • confirmation that the foreign national has been employed (via payroll or by contract) continuously (full-time, not accumulated part-time) by the enterprise outside Canada, in a similar full-time position, for at least one year within the three-year period immediately preceding the date of initial application;
    • outline of the applicant’s position in an executive or managerial capacity or one involving specialized knowledge (i.e. position, title, place in the organization, job description);
    • in the case of “specialized knowledge”, evidence that the person has such knowledge and that the position in Canada requires such knowledge;
    • outline of the position in Canada (namely, position, title, place in the organization, job description);
    • indication of intended duration of stay; and
    • description of the relationship between the enterprise in Canada and the enterprise in the foreign country (the officer may request tangible proof to establish the relationship between the Canadian and foreign organization wishing to make the transfer).

    Source:https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/publications-manuals/operational-bulletins-manuals/temporary-residents/foreign-workers/exemption-codes/intra-company-transferees.html